Lovers Cry Out In Unison At Dusk, As Pelican At Singing Sunset Hovers Like Humming Birds – IMRAN™

Come, my loves, be mine, at sunset, where fantasy becomes reality, and reality becomes you, and you become mine.

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Lovers Cry Out In Unison At Dusk, As Pelican At Singing Sunset Hovers Like Humming Birds – IMRAN™

Sunsets sometimes sing silently, as flapping pelicans in a chorus hover across the crescendos of red and gold clouds,. The dusk settles into its gentle chorus, singing a sweet lullaby of love and passion, odes to dreams and desires, unloading beams of lights and hard shafts of shadows, as the sultry night serenades the hot sun, and the wetness of Tampa Bay is coated in the hues of solitude, soaking in the whiteness of life into the blend of ecstasy, Come, my loves, be mine, at sunset, where fantasy becomes reality, and reality becomes you, and you become mine.

© 2018 IMRAN™

#IMRAN; #ImranAnwar; #Florida; #sunset; #TampaBay; #ApolloBeach; #boating; #boat; #silhouette; #dusk; #clouds; #water; #seaside; #ocean; #waterfront; #lifestyle; #luxury; #adventure; #Christmas; #holidays; #winter; @nikonusa #D850; #HDR

What Workloads Should Or Shouldn’t Move To The Cloud? – IMRAN

There should not be a generic “All workloads of Type X can move to the cloud” nor a “Workloads of Type Y should NEVER move to the cloud” attitude.

Dramatic Cloud Dusk At Tampa Bay – IMRAN™

…a very windy and stormy day’s sunset, but the dramatic cloud cover and the fiery colors made it beautiful…

Another Brick In The (Fire)Wall Versus The Great Wall Of Red China! – IMRAN™

In 1998-1999 I had the privilege of being the first person to be invited to speak to the leadership of the United States Space & Missile Defense Command (think of it as Star Wars or Crystal Palance from one of my favorite #‎movies as a kid, War Games) at a top secret location in Huntsville, Alabama!

CURES For Security Challenges In Cloud, Crowd, Big Data And The Big Bad World

start thinking in terms of erasing boundaries between security departments — not just in IT but even with and within non-IT. At the level of criical importance their Star Wars program was (and the nature of information today must be even more important and the threats even more nefarious and multifarious), not only would there be attempts, I said, to break in over the network, but physically, as well as various combinations.

An industry colleague and fellow blogger/journalist Mary Jander wrote an interesting article, “Security May Be Too Big a Job for IT” on Internet Evolution. It was a thought provoking post. Though I only see two comments on it at the time of writing this article, I am, for someone often taking contrarian views, quite in agreement with both Kim Davis and smkinoshita who wrote comments there. They talked about collaboration, and where the role of Security in an organization should lie.

With the advent of Cloud Computing, and more and more use of public, hybrid and public cloud converged infrastructures, one of the questions I am asked most often is, “Oh, is the cloud secure?”

Ironically, this is common between a housewife sitting on a flight next to me and a CEO that I may be advising.

“Nothing is secure, unless you make it a collaborative business of everyone in the enterprise to make it so,” is what I, sometimes to their chagrin, bluntly tell them.

The problem is how Cloud Security, IT Security, Information Security, Data Security, Premises Security, Perimeter Security, XYZ Security, are still almost islands of imagined security unto themselves. This is not so much a technical limitation as an issue of three major distinct issues.

The first is due to enterprise architectures designed for the last century, or at best, for the last decade.

The second is the human element of doing management by dividing large entities into smaller pieces for easier management. That works great for operations, project management, etc. but is a terrible approach to security.

The third is a lack of collaboration (and integration) where it counts (end-to-end enterprise security) while organizational leaders patting themselves on the back for having rolled out some collaboration platform for sharing Word documents and Excel files.

This problem is not new. It goes back decades.

In 1999, as CEO of EverTrac, a pioneer of location-aware mobile information management & security, I was privileged to speak to top leaders at the United States Space & Missile Defense Command (I still get goosebumps at that name 🙂 and tell people to envisage Crystal Palace in one of my favorite childhood movies, War Games) at an Undisclosed Location in Alabama 🙂 .

But, excitement aside, I was surprised (and seriously concerned) when they were surprised at my saying they had to worry more about the information than about how to secure the servers and data centers, as they were focused on.

Even more, I said, they had to start thinking in terms of erasing boundaries between security departments — not just in IT but even with and within non-IT. At the level of criical importance their Star Wars program was (and the nature of information today must be even more important and the threats even more nefarious and multifarious), not only would there be attempts, I said, to break in over the network, but physically, as well as various combinations.

The advent of mobile devices, global networks, hacking tools, complicated systems with often un-patched vulnerabilities, managed by people either lacking or not interested in keeping up with the latest iterations of technology and security challenges and solutions, all touching the cloud, make for an explosive mixture.

Even in 1999, I declared to my audience that these problems had CURES™.
 
I said Collaborative Unified Realtime Enterprise Security (collaboration was not yet a buzzword then) would be key to solving the problem before it became intractable. Sadly, 12-13 years later, even the top companies in private sector high information value businesses do not get it.
 
I continue to highlight this even more vociferously the more our lives generate, use, and are governed by, floods of big data, accessible to crowds large and small, all in a cloud with nebulous threats and security capabilities. I am glad others are taking up this serious problem.
 
Together, we can find the CURES!
 

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Let’s Talk TV: How The Post-PC Era Enables Mac/PC To Dominate The Post-TV Era

With the visionary, one-man-industryial-revoltion-creator, Steve Jobs, gone, Apple has a chance to deliver on this vision. At the same time, competitors, from Sony to Samsung, Mitsubishi to Microsoft, Goldstar to Google, all have an opportunity to remake an industry and remake themselves. As a bonus, they could prove Steve Jobs wrong on his Post-PC contention.

I read an article in InfoWorld about the evolutionary paths of Apple‘s iOS and OS X operating systems. The more I thought about it, the more I became convinced that the next evolution of these operating systems is also an incredible opportunity for a parallel paradigm shift — from a newly emerging Post-PC to a Post-TV era. Here’s why.

In my opinion, there are many different options open to Apple, in what strategy to follow. That also means several options for the technology industry in general to contemplate, rather than wait for Apple’s moves and then trying to play catch up.

It would make perfect sense to see these “two” Apple operating systems (both with similar underpinnings) follow the typical development path — of launching bare essential features, adding features, improving usability, improving performance, and then bringing in new features to start the cycle over again.

In this next decade, all this will be happening in an area not just of convergence in the technology arena (from cloud computing for consumers and converged infrastructure data centers for corporations), but also the form and factor areas of consumer & technology products; the convergence of entertainment & communications; and melding of the time we spend living, working & playing.

Steve Jobs while presenting the iPad in San Fr...Image via Wikipedia
We had laptops/desktops, and we had smartphones/iPhones. Then came the late Steve JobsiPad. Even as a Mac and Apple fan from it’s launch as a company, a platform, and a way of life, I was not certain how big a market iPad would find. It went on to create a whole new market category.

More people increasingly expect to be able to do everything they can do on a laptop now on their iPad and even iPhone in many cases. And the reverse of that is an increasing expectation too. People want user interface, display quality, and app features from the mobile platform to be fit where appropriate on the desktop/laptop, the PC that is.

We can easily imagine retina quality laptop displays (requiring higher resolution handing in the computer OS), touch interfaces, etc. making their way into laptops and desktops.

By the very nature of us living in an increasingly mobile world, the lower price point for cell phones versus laptops, the greater convenience of tablets than carrying laptops, etc. we can obviously continue the market share of handheld mobile devices to grow over even increasingly ‘mobile’ wireless connected laptops.

But, much that I agree with Steve Jobs’ contention that we live in a Post-PC age, it does not, at least in my opinion, mean the end of the PC. Instead, it is my contention that there is a huge opportunity for laptop (and desktop) makers to avoid becoming the platform that dies out and instead to make it the coming second age of the PC.

At the very least they can build in 3D, much more powerful iterations of Siri-like (voice recognition and context driven intelligent assistant) logic on board, rather than requiring an internet connection as the iPhone 4S version requires. These are just some of the features they can add, but they also have a huge opportunity to pull a side-slide instead of being left behind in a paradigm shift.

Everyone agrees that the TV industry is ripe for massive change – one that even Apple and Steve Jobs failed to truly deliver on with AppleTV.

Image representing Apple TV as depicted in Cru...Image via CrunchBaseWith the visionary, one-man-industryial-revoltion-creator, Steve Jobs, gone, Apple has a chance to deliver on this vision. At the same time, competitors, from Sony to Samsung, Mitsubishi to Microsoft, Goldstar to Google, all have an opportunity to remake an industry and remake themselves. As a bonus, they could prove Steve Jobs wrong on his Post-PC contention.

Let mobile devices with cloud connectivity increasingly make Personal Computers less important for “Computing”. Instead, make PCs drive the TV experience that industry and society are ready for, even though they don’t know it.

Here is just one small bit of how I see this near-term future… [Long ‘Vision‘ Sentence Alert].

The ability to have the same device intelligently streaming exactly the programs we want to see on our big screen, the ads we are less likely to scream at, an ability to click a micropayment to skip a commercial at a particular cliffhanger moment, an ability to click our Likes or + on shows, specific scenes, even product placements, or characters, all while working on a video our 1080p iPhone or smartphone recorded that day, being edited in iMovie, automatically shared in the cloud, and onto new services that enable friends and fans to show appreciation (or make micro-payments) for our masterpieces, with built-in mechanisms for leading channels to track popularity of our creations on the fly in dynamic new content marketplaces, and bidding on them in real time, so they get added to their programming catalogs and we get paid… all while watching House on any TV in the house.

Welcome to the Post-TV PC/Mac. It is time for your company and you to think of Mobile representing the Post-PC world — with a parallel universe emerging, where the [PC/Mac/Your Product] is the hub of the Post-TV era.

Tech, television and electronics company leaders… Do touch that dial. Let’s change the channel(s).

What do you think? Have your people call my people. Let’s Talk TV.

© 2011 Imran Anwar
IMRAN.TV

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Question The Tough Questions To Ask In Cloud Computing

I am on record as suggesting that tough questions need to be asked by everyone (including clients, media AND vendors) before jumping on the Cloud Computing bandwagon. (See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYl-tzTHtQk which I recorded even before having a day job at the leading Cloud Computing Converged Infrastructure vendor.)

I am on record as suggesting that tough questions need to be asked by everyone (including clients, media AND vendors) before jumping on the Cloud Computing bandwagon. (See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYl-tzTHtQk which I recorded even before having a day job at the leading Cloud Computing Converged Infrastructure vendor.)

I read a recent article, Some tough questions you need to ask your cloud provider,  by Rutrell Yasin. It is in the respected GCN (Government Computer News), a publication I also recall being interviewed by in the past. That was during my days of being CEO, EverTrac, the pioneer in location-aware eBusiness solutions, including tracking people and assets, indoors and outdoors, in the late 1990s.

In it, the writer quotes, Wolf Tombe, chief technology officer within the Customs and Border Protection’s Office of Information Technology. I am certain Mr. Tombe is far smarter, more experienced and clout-carryng in government, technology, and probably even Cloud Computing circles than I am.

But, I also respectfully disagree with his contention that some applications are “easy wins moving to the cloud, such as e-mail and collaboration tools”.

If “easy” refers to how quickly and conveniently an app can be deployed onto a cloud or converged infrastructure, then I would say, most apps, whether email, or ISV created vertical solutions, can be migrated with reasonable convenience and the expected amount of work.

If the contention is that somehow email and collaboration are no brainers to put in the public cloud, I strongly disagree.

I think that is over simplistic and dangerous. What apps are no-brainers to move to the public cloud should depend on the mission-critical or sensitive nature of the data or functionality in the app, not what the app itself is.

For example, even the simple email and internal discussion files of a nuclear weapons design agency with just 100 people would be far more critical to protect than, say, all the accounting data of a widget making company with 5000 employees.

So, as I have said before, tough questions need to be asked… by clients, by media, and even by vendors. The stakes are too high, the opportunity too huge, and the threats too serious for any of these elements to be glossed over.

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